What is Wi-Fi Calling?

Extend affordable VoIP capabilities to your mobile devices with Wi-Fi calling

employee-using-wifi-to-call-teammates.jpg

What is Wi-Fi Calling?

Extend affordable VoIP capabilities to your mobile devices with Wi-Fi calling

employee-using-wifi-to-call-teammates.jpg

What is Wi-Fi Calling?

Extend affordable VoIP capabilities to your mobile devices with Wi-Fi calling

employee-using-wifi-to-call-teammates.jpg

What is Wi-Fi Calling?

Extend affordable VoIP capabilities to your mobile devices with Wi-Fi calling

employee-using-wifi-to-call-teammates.jpg

Whether you’re looking for a new calling plan, exploring calling options, or searching for new ways to use mobile devices to connect with others, improving your communications is always a worthwhile endeavor.

Wi-Fi calling is often overlooked as a solution, but it’s worth considering as an alternative to making calls using a traditional cellular network (aka, mobile network). You can even use it to extend your business communications system to include your mobile devices.

Before we get into the reasons why, let’s start with some more basic questions. How do Wi-Fi calls work? How can you place a Wi-Fi call? And why should you consider using this calling feature? We’ll get into all of that, and more.

Whether you’re looking for a new calling plan, exploring calling options, or searching for new ways to use mobile devices to connect with others, improving your communications is always a worthwhile endeavor.

Wi-Fi calling is often overlooked as a solution, but it’s worth considering as an alternative to making calls using a traditional cellular network (aka, mobile network). You can even use it to extend your business communications system to include your mobile devices.

Before we get into the reasons why, let’s start with some more basic questions. How do Wi-Fi calls work? How can you place a Wi-Fi call? And why should you consider using this calling feature? We’ll get into all of that, and more.

Whether you’re looking for a new calling plan, exploring calling options, or searching for new ways to use mobile devices to connect with others, improving your communications is always a worthwhile endeavor.

Wi-Fi calling is often overlooked as a solution, but it’s worth considering as an alternative to making calls using a traditional cellular network (aka, mobile network). You can even use it to extend your business communications system to include your mobile devices.

Before we get into the reasons why, let’s start with some more basic questions. How do Wi-Fi calls work? How can you place a Wi-Fi call? And why should you consider using this calling feature? We’ll get into all of that, and more.

Whether you’re looking for a new calling plan, exploring calling options, or searching for new ways to use mobile devices to connect with others, improving your communications is always a worthwhile endeavor.

Wi-Fi calling is often overlooked as a solution, but it’s worth considering as an alternative to making calls using a traditional cellular network (aka, mobile network). You can even use it to extend your business communications system to include your mobile devices.

Before we get into the reasons why, let’s start with some more basic questions. How do Wi-Fi calls work? How can you place a Wi-Fi call? And why should you consider using this calling feature? We’ll get into all of that, and more.

What is Wi-Fi calling?

What is Wi-Fi calling?

What is Wi-Fi calling?

What is Wi-Fi calling?

Wi-Fi calling is telephony that allows devices—mainly smartphones and tablets—to make calls via the internet using a wireless network connection.

Wi-Fi is a technology that uses a wireless router to transmit signals to devices within the network’s coverage, allowing Wi-Fi-enabled smartphones and computers to connect to the internet.

Fun fact: What does Wi-Fi stand for?

While it’s easy to think that Wi-Fi means “wireless fidelity” (most people do), it actually doesn’t mean anything. The term “Wi-Fi” was coined by marketers who were helping the wireless technology industry come up with a name that users can easily remember.

The actual tech is called IEEE 802.11—which, admittedly, isn’t very consumer-friendly.

Wi-Fi calling is telephony that allows devices—mainly smartphones and tablets—to make calls via the internet using a wireless network connection.

Wi-Fi is a technology that uses a wireless router to transmit signals to devices within the network’s coverage, allowing Wi-Fi-enabled smartphones and computers to connect to the internet.

Fun fact: What does Wi-Fi stand for?

While it’s easy to think that Wi-Fi means “wireless fidelity” (most people do), it actually doesn’t mean anything. The term “Wi-Fi” was coined by marketers who were helping the wireless technology industry come up with a name that users can easily remember.

The actual tech is called IEEE 802.11—which, admittedly, isn’t very consumer-friendly.

Wi-Fi calling is telephony that allows devices—mainly smartphones and tablets—to make calls via the internet using a wireless network connection.

Wi-Fi is a technology that uses a wireless router to transmit signals to devices within the network’s coverage, allowing Wi-Fi-enabled smartphones and computers to connect to the internet.

Fun fact: What does Wi-Fi stand for?

While it’s easy to think that Wi-Fi means “wireless fidelity” (most people do), it actually doesn’t mean anything. The term “Wi-Fi” was coined by marketers who were helping the wireless technology industry come up with a name that users can easily remember.

The actual tech is called IEEE 802.11—which, admittedly, isn’t very consumer-friendly.

Wi-Fi calling is telephony that allows devices—mainly smartphones and tablets—to make calls via the internet using a wireless network connection.

Wi-Fi is a technology that uses a wireless router to transmit signals to devices within the network’s coverage, allowing Wi-Fi-enabled smartphones and computers to connect to the internet.

Fun fact: What does Wi-Fi stand for?

While it’s easy to think that Wi-Fi means “wireless fidelity” (most people do), it actually doesn’t mean anything. The term “Wi-Fi” was coined by marketers who were helping the wireless technology industry come up with a name that users can easily remember.

The actual tech is called IEEE 802.11—which, admittedly, isn’t very consumer-friendly.

How does Wi-Fi calling work?

The way Wi-Fi calling works is quite simple—you just need to remember that it’s a way of using VoIP (Voice over Internet Protocol).

VoIP, the technology that makes it possible for everyone to make calls over the internet, breaks your audio input down into data packets that can be delivered through a digital network and then reintegrated when they reach their destination. Wi-Fi calls typically take audio input from a cellular network, translate them into VoIP packets, deliver them through the internet, and translate them back into audio in the receiver’s cellular network.

What do I need to make a Wi-Fi call?

Now that we know how it works in general, we can get into how it works specifically from the point of view of the user.

You don’t need much to start placing Wi-Fi calls. Put briefly, all you need is a wireless connection and a device you use for phone calls that also gives you a Wi-Fi calling option. That includes:

  • An Android phone
  • An Apple iPhone
  • A non-Android or Apple mobile phone (as long as it’s a smartphone)
  • Even an Apple Watch.

You can use that device to place a call via its connection to Wi-Fi. To make sure that it uses the internet rather than a regular cellular connection for your calls, you need to make sure you enable Wi-Fi calling for your Wi-Fi-connected devices first.

Once you have that enabled, you can use Wi-Fi signals to make voice calls, send SMS or text messages, and place video calls. That means you can use your mobile device as a VoIP (Voice over Internet Protocol) business phone as long as you can connect to the internet on a non-cellular network.

All you need is:

  • Strong Wi-Fi connection (via Wi-Fi network)
  • An Android, iPhone, cloud phone, or other mobile device
  • A mobile app that lets you use your company’s virtual phone software

Characteristics of strong Wi-Fi networks

Strong Wi-Fi networks are a must for anyone hoping to make a lot of Wi-Fi calls. The stability of the connection affects call quality, and whether you and your contacts can communicate in real-time with little to no risk of dropped calls. It’s like you’re making regular cell phone calls, except it’s your Wi-Fi connection that’s vital, not your cellular coverage or cellular signal in the area.

Here are the qualities of strong Wi-Fi networks:

  • Can support many users
  • Good bandwidth
  • Steady and consistent

Can support many users

A Wi-Fi network should, ideally, be able to support the daily communications of as many people as possible.

The network you use in the office shouldn’t slow down or lag when more users use it. You can test this by having more workers use the service at a given time. This is the simplest way to check if your network is strong enough to support your workforce.

If you have employees who work remotely from a shared space, ask them to check the Wi-Fi coverage of their location (and make arrangements as necessary).

Good bandwidth

If your Wi-Fi network lets you make calls, watch videos online, and download software at the same time (without buffering or those infuriating status bars), that’s a good indication that you’ve got high bandwidth.

More bandwidth means more simultaneous internet capabilities. It also means your devices will complete internet-related tasks more quickly, and can support more collaborative communications features like video conferencing.

Steady and consistent

Patchy networks lead to audio coming in late or even being dropped altogether. You’d want yours to be consistent in its quality, regardless of any outside factors.

Android, iPhone, or cloud phone

If your Android device, Apple device, or other mobile device lets you activate Wi-Fi calling, you can use it to place Wi-Fi calls.

You generally don’t need to have specific software with a Wi-Fi calling feature to make it work, though apps like WhatsApp will automatically use your Wi-Fi network instead of a cellular phone line to make your voice calls.

Again, all you need to do is activate Wi-Fi calling on your internet-capable device to use your cell phone for Wi-Fi-based calls and texts.

It’s important to clarify at this point that the text messaging supported by Wi-Fi calling only covers SMS capabilities included in applications designed to wok with the internet. So if you’re using your mobile phone’s native texting app—the one you can use with or without being connected to the internet—those texts will pretty much always be using up your cellular minutes. But if you’re using another you’ve downloaded independently, like the all-in-one work communications app by 8x8, you won’t be using cellular credits for that at all. More on this in a bit.

Android, iPhone, or cloud phone

If your Android device, Apple device, or other mobile device lets you activate Wi-Fi calling, you can use it to place Wi-Fi calls.

You generally don’t need to have specific software with a Wi-Fi calling feature to make it work, though apps like WhatsApp will automatically use your Wi-Fi network instead of a cellular phone line to make your voice calls.

Again, all you need to do is activate Wi-Fi calling on your internet-capable device to use your cell phone for Wi-Fi-based calls and texts.

It’s important to clarify at this point that the text messaging supported by Wi-Fi calling only covers SMS capabilities included in applications designed to wok with the internet. So if you’re using your mobile phone’s native texting app—the one you can use with or without being connected to the internet—those texts will pretty much always be using up your cellular minutes. But if you’re using another you’ve downloaded independently, like the all-in-one work communications app by 8x8, you won’t be using cellular credits for that at all. More on this in a bit.

Android, iPhone, or cloud phone

If your Android device, Apple device, or other mobile device lets you activate Wi-Fi calling, you can use it to place Wi-Fi calls.

You generally don’t need to have specific software with a Wi-Fi calling feature to make it work, though apps like WhatsApp will automatically use your Wi-Fi network instead of a cellular phone line to make your voice calls.

Again, all you need to do is activate Wi-Fi calling on your internet-capable device to use your cell phone for Wi-Fi-based calls and texts.

It’s important to clarify at this point that the text messaging supported by Wi-Fi calling only covers SMS capabilities included in applications designed to wok with the internet. So if you’re using your mobile phone’s native texting app—the one you can use with or without being connected to the internet—those texts will pretty much always be using up your cellular minutes. But if you’re using another you’ve downloaded independently, like the all-in-one work communications app by 8x8, you won’t be using cellular credits for that at all. More on this in a bit.

Android, iPhone, or cloud phone

If your Android device, Apple device, or other mobile device lets you activate Wi-Fi calling, you can use it to place Wi-Fi calls.

You generally don’t need to have specific software with a Wi-Fi calling feature to make it work, though apps like WhatsApp will automatically use your Wi-Fi network instead of a cellular phone line to make your voice calls.

Again, all you need to do is activate Wi-Fi calling on your internet-capable device to use your cell phone for Wi-Fi-based calls and texts.

It’s important to clarify at this point that the text messaging supported by Wi-Fi calling only covers SMS capabilities included in applications designed to wok with the internet. So if you’re using your mobile phone’s native texting app—the one you can use with or without being connected to the internet—those texts will pretty much always be using up your cellular minutes. But if you’re using another you’ve downloaded independently, like the all-in-one work communications app by 8x8, you won’t be using cellular credits for that at all. More on this in a bit.

Difference between cellular data calls & Wi-Fi calls (in a nutshell)

Difference between cellular data calls & Wi-Fi calls (in a nutshell)

Difference between cellular data calls & Wi-Fi calls (in a nutshell)

Difference between cellular data calls & Wi-Fi calls (in a nutshell)

From the point of view of people using smartphones, there’s no obvious difference between a cellular call and a Wi-Fi call. It’s no surprise since the experience is similar overall.

But as we’ve mentioned before, there are distinctions in terms of the networks through which calls are transmitted—which also affects how they’re delivered. Remember: Wi-Fi calling works through an internet connection care of VoIP technology, which requires the audio input to be turned into data packets. In contrast, calls made through cellular data are delivered as electrical signals.

Another thing to note about cellular phone calls is that you need a data plan with your cellular service to make it work, otherwise you’ll incur an additional charge—especially when international roaming is involved. Using a mobile hotspot (that is, cellular data to access the internet) for a long time also shortens your battery life.

Compare that with making calls using a Wi-Fi connection: unless you’re in a place where you need to pay to get a Wi-Fi password to the network, you’re not going to get charged for calls. And there’s a growing number of places around the world where anyone can access Wi-Fi for free.

From the point of view of people using smartphones, there’s no obvious difference between a cellular call and a Wi-Fi call. It’s no surprise since the experience is similar overall.

But as we’ve mentioned before, there are distinctions in terms of the networks through which calls are transmitted—which also affects how they’re delivered. Remember: Wi-Fi calling works through an internet connection care of VoIP technology, which requires the audio input to be turned into data packets. In contrast, calls made through cellular data are delivered as electrical signals.

Another thing to note about cellular phone calls is that you need a data plan with your cellular service to make it work, otherwise you’ll incur an additional charge—especially when international roaming is involved. Using a mobile hotspot (that is, cellular data to access the internet) for a long time also shortens your battery life.

Compare that with making calls using a Wi-Fi connection: unless you’re in a place where you need to pay to get a Wi-Fi password to the network, you’re not going to get charged for calls. And there’s a growing number of places around the world where anyone can access Wi-Fi for free.

From the point of view of people using smartphones, there’s no obvious difference between a cellular call and a Wi-Fi call. It’s no surprise since the experience is similar overall.

But as we’ve mentioned before, there are distinctions in terms of the networks through which calls are transmitted—which also affects how they’re delivered. Remember: Wi-Fi calling works through an internet connection care of VoIP technology, which requires the audio input to be turned into data packets. In contrast, calls made through cellular data are delivered as electrical signals.

Another thing to note about cellular phone calls is that you need a data plan with your cellular service to make it work, otherwise you’ll incur an additional charge—especially when international roaming is involved. Using a mobile hotspot (that is, cellular data to access the internet) for a long time also shortens your battery life.

Compare that with making calls using a Wi-Fi connection: unless you’re in a place where you need to pay to get a Wi-Fi password to the network, you’re not going to get charged for calls. And there’s a growing number of places around the world where anyone can access Wi-Fi for free.

From the point of view of people using smartphones, there’s no obvious difference between a cellular call and a Wi-Fi call. It’s no surprise since the experience is similar overall.

But as we’ve mentioned before, there are distinctions in terms of the networks through which calls are transmitted—which also affects how they’re delivered. Remember: Wi-Fi calling works through an internet connection care of VoIP technology, which requires the audio input to be turned into data packets. In contrast, calls made through cellular data are delivered as electrical signals.

Another thing to note about cellular phone calls is that you need a data plan with your cellular service to make it work, otherwise you’ll incur an additional charge—especially when international roaming is involved. Using a mobile hotspot (that is, cellular data to access the internet) for a long time also shortens your battery life.

Compare that with making calls using a Wi-Fi connection: unless you’re in a place where you need to pay to get a Wi-Fi password to the network, you’re not going to get charged for calls. And there’s a growing number of places around the world where anyone can access Wi-Fi for free.

Top reasons for enabling Wi-Fi calling

Top reasons for enabling Wi-Fi calling

Top reasons for enabling Wi-Fi calling

Top reasons for enabling Wi-Fi calling

  • It’s easy to use. You can keep using the calling and messenger apps you’re already familiar with. That means you don’t have to invest time into learning new functionalities.
  • You can set it up quickly. It only takes minutes to get your Wi-Fi calling system fully ready to go.
  • It works with any mobile device that can connect to the internet. Whether you like to place calls from your smartphone, your tablet, or even your smartwatch, you can easily do so.

Other ways the calling experience is improved by Wi-Fi calling

On top of what we’ve mentioned above, using Wi-Fi also helps improve the calling experience in three principal ways:

  • Cheaper international calling
  • Cross-app compatibility
  • Call from anywhere

International calling

Calling to international phone numbers is much more affordable when you use Wi-Fi because you won’t have to worry about paying exorbitant call or SMS rates.

You can make phone calls and take part in video conferencing with anyone in the world using an internet connection.—you don’t even need SIM cards for this. You can set up a simple global connection with anyone through Wi-Fi calling.

Cross-app compatibility

If your phone supports Wi-Fi calling, you can use different VoIP apps to connect with anyone.

This is particularly useful for professionals who focus on personalized relationships. If customers or clients prefer using particular VoIP calling apps, said apps can simply be installed on the device.

Call from anywhere

Your Wi-Fi calling service is only limited in the sense that you need to make sure there’s an accessible Wi-Fi network or hotspot in the area (thankfully, they’re everywhere now) before you can even attempt to make a non-cellular data call. Think of it in terms of the bring your own device model, but expand it outside of the office to any place that lets you connect to the internet can.

That’s why it’s so appealing to any business that invests in a virtual phone system— having this enabled means workers can use any place as a workspace, conference room, and/or private call spot.

Pros and cons of Wi-Fi calling

While the reasons to use Wi-FI calling are compelling, we mustn’t forget that there are also some drawbacks. Here’s a quick summary of the pros and cons, side-by-side.

ProsCons
You can make calls to anyone, including international calls, without eating into your data usage or calling plan minutesIf there’s no accessible or public Wi-Fi nearby, you can’t make Wi-Fi calls
Wi-Fi calls can be made when your smartphone is in airplane modeAnytime you’re in a place that’s got weak Wi-Fi or an unreliable connection, you won’t be able to make HD voice calls and may suffer low call quality
With Wi-Fi calling, traveling abroad becomes easier because you’ll still be able to call international numbers (or US numbers from your international location) with ease and at low cost Having access to a Wi-Fi network doesn’t guarantee signal strength

Pros and cons of Wi-Fi calling

While the reasons to use Wi-FI calling are compelling, we mustn’t forget that there are also some drawbacks. Here’s a quick summary of the pros and cons, side-by-side.

ProsCons
You can make calls to anyone, including international calls, without eating into your data usage or calling plan minutesIf there’s no accessible or public Wi-Fi nearby, you can’t make Wi-Fi calls
Wi-Fi calls can be made when your smartphone is in airplane modeAnytime you’re in a place that’s got weak Wi-Fi or an unreliable connection, you won’t be able to make HD voice calls and may suffer low call quality
With Wi-Fi calling, traveling abroad becomes easier because you’ll still be able to call international numbers (or US numbers from your international location) with ease and at low cost Having access to a Wi-Fi network doesn’t guarantee signal strength

Pros and cons of Wi-Fi calling

While the reasons to use Wi-FI calling are compelling, we mustn’t forget that there are also some drawbacks. Here’s a quick summary of the pros and cons, side-by-side.

ProsCons
You can make calls to anyone, including international calls, without eating into your data usage or calling plan minutesIf there’s no accessible or public Wi-Fi nearby, you can’t make Wi-Fi calls
Wi-Fi calls can be made when your smartphone is in airplane modeAnytime you’re in a place that’s got weak Wi-Fi or an unreliable connection, you won’t be able to make HD voice calls and may suffer low call quality
With Wi-Fi calling, traveling abroad becomes easier because you’ll still be able to call international numbers (or US numbers from your international location) with ease and at low cost Having access to a Wi-Fi network doesn’t guarantee signal strength

Pros and cons of Wi-Fi calling

While the reasons to use Wi-FI calling are compelling, we mustn’t forget that there are also some drawbacks. Here’s a quick summary of the pros and cons, side-by-side.

ProsCons
You can make calls to anyone, including international calls, without eating into your data usage or calling plan minutesIf there’s no accessible or public Wi-Fi nearby, you can’t make Wi-Fi calls
Wi-Fi calls can be made when your smartphone is in airplane modeAnytime you’re in a place that’s got weak Wi-Fi or an unreliable connection, you won’t be able to make HD voice calls and may suffer low call quality
With Wi-Fi calling, traveling abroad becomes easier because you’ll still be able to call international numbers (or US numbers from your international location) with ease and at low cost Having access to a Wi-Fi network doesn’t guarantee signal strength

How to set up Wi-Fi calling

How to set up Wi-Fi calling

How to set up Wi-Fi calling

How to set up Wi-Fi calling

All you need to do to start calling and messaging using your Wi-Fi connection is follow three simple steps:

  1. Connect to the internet. You can do this via your home or business Wi-Fi router, a public Wi-Fi network, or using a Wi-Fi hotspot (we recommend using private networks, though).
  2. Enable Wi-Fi calling. if your device can support Wi-Fi calling, you’ll find the Wi-Fi calling setting within your phone’s call settings. Practically any Android or iOS device will let you make Wi-Fi calls.
  3. Test your internet connection. This can be done using special apps or by making a test call. If you can, try it out with an international long-distance call. After all, if your connection can handle long-distance calls, you’ll be able to call anyone, anywhere.

The steps you take to set up Wi-Fi calling are similar regardless of your intention to make a Wi-Fi call on Android, iOS, or another device. That means you can follow them whether you’re using a Samsung Galaxy or iPhone 6.

All you need to do to start calling and messaging using your Wi-Fi connection is follow three simple steps:

  1. Connect to the internet. You can do this via your home or business Wi-Fi router, a public Wi-Fi network, or using a Wi-Fi hotspot (we recommend using private networks, though).
  2. Enable Wi-Fi calling. if your device can support Wi-Fi calling, you’ll find the Wi-Fi calling setting within your phone’s call settings. Practically any Android or iOS device will let you make Wi-Fi calls.
  3. Test your internet connection. This can be done using special apps or by making a test call. If you can, try it out with an international long-distance call. After all, if your connection can handle long-distance calls, you’ll be able to call anyone, anywhere.

The steps you take to set up Wi-Fi calling are similar regardless of your intention to make a Wi-Fi call on Android, iOS, or another device. That means you can follow them whether you’re using a Samsung Galaxy or iPhone 6.

All you need to do to start calling and messaging using your Wi-Fi connection is follow three simple steps:

  1. Connect to the internet. You can do this via your home or business Wi-Fi router, a public Wi-Fi network, or using a Wi-Fi hotspot (we recommend using private networks, though).
  2. Enable Wi-Fi calling. if your device can support Wi-Fi calling, you’ll find the Wi-Fi calling setting within your phone’s call settings. Practically any Android or iOS device will let you make Wi-Fi calls.
  3. Test your internet connection. This can be done using special apps or by making a test call. If you can, try it out with an international long-distance call. After all, if your connection can handle long-distance calls, you’ll be able to call anyone, anywhere.

The steps you take to set up Wi-Fi calling are similar regardless of your intention to make a Wi-Fi call on Android, iOS, or another device. That means you can follow them whether you’re using a Samsung Galaxy or iPhone 6.

All you need to do to start calling and messaging using your Wi-Fi connection is follow three simple steps:

  1. Connect to the internet. You can do this via your home or business Wi-Fi router, a public Wi-Fi network, or using a Wi-Fi hotspot (we recommend using private networks, though).
  2. Enable Wi-Fi calling. if your device can support Wi-Fi calling, you’ll find the Wi-Fi calling setting within your phone’s call settings. Practically any Android or iOS device will let you make Wi-Fi calls.
  3. Test your internet connection. This can be done using special apps or by making a test call. If you can, try it out with an international long-distance call. After all, if your connection can handle long-distance calls, you’ll be able to call anyone, anywhere.

The steps you take to set up Wi-Fi calling are similar regardless of your intention to make a Wi-Fi call on Android, iOS, or another device. That means you can follow them whether you’re using a Samsung Galaxy or iPhone 6.

Wi-Fi calling FAQs (frequently asked questions)

Wi-Fi calling FAQs (frequently asked questions)

Wi-Fi calling FAQs (frequently asked questions)

Wi-Fi calling FAQs (frequently asked questions)

Can I make Wi-Fi calls outside of my registered address?

You absolutely can, because Wi-Fi calls are generally associated with virtual phone numbers that don’t necessarily require you to have a registered location. That said, you can also use a virtual phone number with a registered address if it’s associated with a cloud-based VoIP or UCaaS (Unified Communications as a Service) solution for business without having to be at the location assigned.

Can I register an emergency address?

Yes, and it’s always a good idea to keep your E911 address updated so emergency services can find you when they need to.

You can change your emergency address via your settings. Tap on Wi-Fi Calling within your device’s settings, and you should be able to set your emergency address as necessary. That way, you can save time if emergency calling becomes necessary—the operator will be able to see your address, even if you can’t tell them while dealing with a catastrophe.

Do you get charged for Wi-Fi calling?

In short: Not exactly. There’s no specific Wi-Fi calling cost you always have to pay—whether it’s a local or international rate.

If you’re always in a place where you’ve got access to excellent Wi-Fi, you won’t need to pay for data, so you won’t get charged either. You’d also likely be able to save on your phone bill since you’ve got constant network coverage and can make all your calls as Wi-Fi calls.

To have Wi-Fi connectivity at home or work, however, you’ll obviously have to pay your internet service provider. You may also get charged for using a Wi-Fi connection in general if you’re traveling in a place where free public hotspots aren’t common—in cases like this, you’ll need to rely on establishments that offer Wi-FI for a fee

The 8x8 Work app allows you to use Wi-Fi calling for your business phone calls, on top of giving you access to team chat and video meeting capabilities. If you want to know more about how 8x8 can help your company stay productive, reach out to our sales team.